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Purchase of service: Read and save data from piko measuring cart.

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MarkMLl:

--- Quote from: lgrfbs on October 16, 2020, 11:09:45 am ---CPU2: XMEGA 32A4U MH1710 KOREA-AB 35965E A88P8A  - Main PCB, This is on the key and USB board

--- End quote ---

OK, that's new info. I'm not going back to check, but I suspect that the link I gave you that discusses decoding the file is for a different target in which case it's clearly not relevant. An ATMEGA disassembler might make some sense of that binary, but the important thing is that it's not something simple like a Python script which is immediately readable.


--- Quote ---Sure, I could build and program my own measuring trolley, but now I want to get to this so that other model railway hobby practitioners can also get much more out of this wagon as it is already on the market.

--- End quote ---

Which is likely to mean new electronics as a drop-in replacement.


--- Quote ---How hard would it be to write a program that listens to the raw data from the cart?
What I need to tell the program is the IP number that the cart has for the rest is known from WireShark:
UDP on port 55555.

--- End quote ---

Well, you've got the Wireshark captures. My own recollection from looking at them in the past is not very easy... at the very least I think you're going to need to make a "rolling road" arrangement so that you can move the wagon at a simulated controlled speed, simulate different cambers and so on.

Seriously. Your best bet is going to be to look at how that wagon is put together, and work out whether you could both make a drop-in replacement for existing wagons and apply the same thing to a new design... providing that you use cleanroom code you're probably legally OK. Oh, and for this you probably want to use TCP, unless you're pretty confident that your code is handshaking at a higher level.

Railways have used dynamometer cars since the C19th, and I'd remind you of Babbage's story of helping out when the only way to check the track was to release a wagon and time how long it took to stop (in his case, he arrived at the next station after jury-rigging a sail). There's almost certainly a niche market for somebody who can convert a wagon in a customer's chosen livery into an effective dynamometer, and being in control of the physical side of that would probably be adequate to protect against flagrant reuse of any code you choose to open-source.

Go for it man, and remember that if you don't there's multiple people in here that might see a viable opportunity... and many more reading courtesy of Google.

MarkMLl

lgrfbs:
The term "cleanroom code" I have not heard before, guess that means I have written everything myself and not looked at anyone else's code.
In the same way as React OS has done.

Babbage's story was new information for me as a Swede, thanks for it was interesting.


--- Quote from: MarkMLl ---"Go for it man, and remember that if you don't there's multiple people in here that might see a viable opportunity... and many more reading courtesy of Google."

--- End quote ---
So it may be but NO ONE has given me any price proposal at all on what was the start of this thread.

MarkMLl:

--- Quote from: lgrfbs on October 16, 2020, 12:23:19 pm ---The term "cleanroom code" I have not heard before, guess that means I have written everything myself and not looked at anyone else's code.
In the same way as React OS has done.

--- End quote ---

In the most rigorous case, there's one team who develops a specification from a program, which possibly includes disassembling it, and a completely distinct team who develops a replacement which is functionally identical. My understanding is that European law allows disassembly in order to develop something which is functionally equivalent, but the ReactOS- and for that matter FPC- approach that people intimately familiar with the Windows/Delphi codebase should not contribute to the open-source one is preferable.


--- Quote ---Babbage's story was new information for me as a Swede, thanks for it was interesting.

--- End quote ---

He was an interesting man. More interesting, I'm afraid, than Per Georg Scheutz :-)


--- Quote ---So it may be but NO ONE has given me any price proposal at all on what was the start of this thread.

--- End quote ---

Well, you must admit that the information has dribbled out fairly slowly, and I'm afraid that most of us- for the moment at least- have our own interests and demands on our time.

MarkMLl

dbannon:

--- Quote from: lgrfbs on October 16, 2020, 12:23:19 pm ---.....
So it may be but NO ONE has given me any price proposal at all on what was the start of this thread.

--- End quote ---

Honestly, I don't think its a commercial prospect. Someone may do it because its fun, they enjoy the challenge or really want the outcome. But if someone was to agree to work at an hourly rate and just do it for the money, you might be looking at 100 hours to make a start, perhaps get to the point where you can tell if its viable or not. What would you accept as an hourly rate ?

A much better approach would be for you to keep working on that wireshark data, if you can find some sort of API, then getting someone to write some code that uses the API would be heaps more practical. Put that research up on (eg) github and see who is also interested.

The data coming from the thing will probably be in some common format, maybe xml, json etc. If you can spot the deliminator, maybe you can start breaking each lump of data down. You may be able to label each field one by one.  very slow process !

Davo

trev:

--- Quote from: lgrfbs on October 16, 2020, 12:23:19 pm ---So it may be but NO ONE has given me any price proposal at all on what was the start of this thread.

--- End quote ---

Without access to the hardware, it's not going to be something someone knocks up in a week. If you're not wanting to do it, it would be best to tap into the community of users of the hardware and see if anyone else wants to (a) help (b) fund it.

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