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Author Topic: Why Lazarus is not as popular as python is?  (Read 2981 times)

BeniBela

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Re: Why Lazarus is not as popular as python is?
« Reply #45 on: August 09, 2020, 01:37:01 pm »


Have you seen the bugs in Java?  Quantity and severity?

I have not encountered bugs in Java

That is the point



Less than 10 years ago "Ruby on rails" was the official successor to Php, at least. Really. Only the last of its "Mohicans" still believe in this, today.

That exactly reflects my feeling too.  One should always consider the alternatives at the time, and also their exact incarnation (read: framework), not just the name of the language.

Just like when I thought Delphi was the future of UI development

marcov

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Re: Why Lazarus is not as popular as python is?
« Reply #46 on: August 09, 2020, 01:48:03 pm »
Less than 10 years ago "Ruby on rails" was the official successor to Php, at least. Really. Only the last of its "Mohicans" still believe in this, today.

That exactly reflects my feeling too.  One should always consider the alternatives at the time, and also their exact incarnation (read: framework), not just the name of the language.

Just like when I thought Delphi was the future of UI development

Well, I still deliver VCL apps after 20 years, 15 years of which in my current job from basically the same codebase, so how bad can it be?  ;)

Seriously, the point was more that when you are deciding development target to consider more than just language (so tooling, framework, reuse of current codebases (*) etc). Also keep your requirements straight and narrow, and don't be tempted to add too many new wishes at once as "nice to haves".

The most extreme example was a boss nagging in the decision process to have it "portable" (because he had a Mac, and about 1% of the customers too), but when we really started already canning it after one week as it being to expensive. I learned from that if people want to add requirements, I immediately ask them allocate extra budget for it. Usually that settles it :_)

(*) whole rewrites nearly always are behind on target.


ASBzone

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Re: Why Lazarus is not as popular as python is?
« Reply #47 on: August 09, 2020, 08:29:09 pm »

Have you seen the bugs in Java?  Quantity and severity?

I have not encountered bugs in Java

That is the point

Our own experiences with product bugs might impact our decisions to use or not use something, but that doesn't determine whether or not a product definitively has bugs.

I have many developer colleagues that have experienced plenty of Java bugs, and each quarter a slew of such bugs are addressed (I care mostly about the security bugs, personally).

I've had only a few bugs in FPC/Lazarus that have impacted me to any degree, and I was able to work around them.   

DISCLAIMER: I am not a professional developer, so my needs are not the same as many, and I realize that.   And I have seen some of the bugs that folks have submitted, and can appreciate how they might impact others.  But, overall, the level of bugs does not appear to be significant relative to what I am aware of in other products/projects.

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Lazarus v2.0.11 r63516 / FPC v3.2.1-r46879 (via FpcUpDeluxe) -- Windows 64-bit install w/32-bit cross-compile
Primary System: Windows 10 Pro x64, Version 2004 (Build 19041.388)
Other Systems: Windows 10 Pro x64, Version 2004 or greater

devEric69

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Re: Why Lazarus is not as popular as python is?
« Reply #48 on: August 13, 2020, 09:21:55 pm »
Quote
Why Lazarus is not as popular as python is?

My 2 cents:

As my salesperson would say: when you only know the hammer, you see nails everywhere :P .
use: Linux 64 bits (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS).
Lazarus version: 2.0.4 (svn revision: 62502M) compiled with fpc 3.0.4 - fpDebug \ Dwarf3.

 

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