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Looking For Remote Programming Job

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zogtrog:
Due to the current global situation I am looking for a remote working programming job using either Lazarus / Free Pascal or Delphi ( I own my own licence for Embarcadero Delphi professional edition )
I was wondering if there are any object pascal jobs around at the moment. I am all set up for remote working.

I am based in the UK and English is my native language.

Thanks for any help in advance.

Jack Taylor

RobertThompson9:
Hello!  I am in the same situation.  I got laid off from a Java position, and all of the Java jobs in my area have through-the-roof requirements using newer technology that I don't have experience with (Angular, REST API, Spring Boot, etc.).  I have extensive Delphi and Object Pascal experience, but there are no Delphi jobs to be found anywhere.  I will keep my eye open.  If I see anything I'll let you know, and please do the same for me.  Thanks so much!

lgrfbs:
What do you consider to be the minimum amount for a small job that has the following parts: WiFi, reads data and saves to CSV file?
Of course, I intend to pay for the service performed, if I can afford to thank "Yes" on the price question's answer.


--- More info ---------------------------------------------
Some time ago I went and bought PIKO's measuring cart which in itself is a nice cart but the software for Windows has some bugs that PIKO has not done anything about, to get rid of the errors.
The main problem with PIKO's software is that the radius of the curves is not saved in the CVS file.
Values for the radius of the curves are displayed live in the program, so I know that the cart transmits the measure value and that the program receives the data, but the CVS save function does not include the real measurement values for the radius of the curves, but it will only be 0 at that position in the CVS file.
PIKO's measuring cart homepage: https://www.piko-shop.de/?a=mw

This is a model railway wagon in scale HO (1:87).
What is measured is:
* DCC data
* DCC Volts
* Track inclined width - right/left (dosed curve)
* Track inclined length - up/down (hill)
* Track Radius
* Mileage
* Speed

 --*---

This is what I want the program to do:
Basic function:
* Connects to the measuring cart's WiFi AP
* Reads streamed data from the measuring cart.
* Saves the received raw data as a CSV file locally on the computer/drive.
* Target OS Windows, MaC & Linux
* Open source and publicly downloadable.

Luxury version 1:
* The received data is decoded to human readable values before being saved in the CSV file.
* The program has a GUI that presents received data live in some neat way.

Giant luxury version:
* All measured data is saved as CSV and STL (3D) file.
* GUI has a 3D window where measuring data is presented as 3D graphics.
* A function to be able to virtually "ride around" on the viruella model railway that collected data has created.


Some row data from Wireshark:
http://lgrfbs.org/SEF/MW20190216.zip (140 Mbyte)

mateli:
Currently Java, C/C++ and Dotnet in that order is in demand where i live, but it is very rare to see a Pascal job. Currently I mostly develop in Java but decided to learn Pascal.

If there isn't a job market for FPC/Delphi we will have to create one. Running a small business I can sell applications but I am not really on the level where I can make FPC applications yet.

I will outline why I chose attempt a switch to pascal based on the other popular languages.

1. Java. This language can be rather useful when writing a particular kind of server application. Or when writing application where long term code management as well as cross platform support is more important than other factors. However for some reason Java IDE:s have all bloated to the degree that I can no longer run them on most on my computers, and where I can they don't run well. Java compiles a lot faster than C/C++ which is a bonus compared to that language and some common errors are rather easy to fix. With Pascal i get the Free Pascal text based editor as well as Lazarus. And of course turbo pascal is also nice. And so far I have not written any code that takes more than a minute to build.

2. C/C++. This is a language that I have used when Java is to slow. The best support for native API:s and good compilers are around. The problems I have with this language is three things. High level stuff like GUI programming and database is not optimal in this language. I could probably write good libs for that but the point is that the existing libraries are insufficient. The next problem is compile time. C is decent to compile but C++ can take FOREVER. Literally, you can have infinite recursion in the template system. With C i additionally have the problem that it is not object oriented and with that is also annoying so I have to chose between no objects and a very bloated language with slow compile times.

3. DotNet well here my main problem is that I run Linux and so do many of my clients. The global market share for non-Windows application are small compared to Windows but for me writing a Windows application means that at least 60% of my clients will not even look at it.

With FPC I can compile code for a sufficient amount of target platforms, including some that is badly covered by C/C++/Java such as FreeDOS. The compile time is fast so the development cycle can be fast. There are the LCL library for GUI:s as well as bindings to several C libraries commonly used in games. Of course the LCL is not as competent as the Java GUI ecosystem(s) and the C library bindings are not as good as actually using C. But I get a decent intersection of both. As for Dotnet it has in common with Delphi a huge amount of Windows only components but as I taget Linux I cannot use them anyway.

So to sum that up I have decided that FPC is probably the language where I can be the most efficient and I assume that this is true for the rest of you.

After that rant the point that i am getting to is that I suggest that we work together to create a FPC/Delphi market. This includes on using free time to work on open source frameworks that can make us more efficient as well as discussing how to bring in more clients for applications written in this language.

My personal approach will not be to well "Pascal" to customers but custom applications. Small business clients rarely asks me what language I will be using. They don't know and they don't care, as long as the software improves their business.

440bx:

--- Quote from: mateli on September 09, 2020, 02:04:22 pm ---I suggest that we work together to create a FPC/Delphi market.

--- End quote ---
The idea has merit but the Delphi (and consequently FPC) market has been dwindling down for quite a number of years.  It's difficult to see what can reverse that trend.


--- Quote from: mateli on September 09, 2020, 02:04:22 pm ---Small business clients rarely asks me what language I will be using. They don't know and they don't care, as long as the software improves their business.

--- End quote ---
That much is true but small businesses rarely pay top dollar for a custom application.  Larger businesses that do pay top dollar often, if not always, care a great deal about the language used to develop the application.

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