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Author Topic: Wiki stub: Make your own compiler, interpreter, parser, or expression analyzer  (Read 6309 times)

Edson

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In your opinion:
What are the best books about compilers or interpreters or assemblers or linkers?
Is there any new (last five or ten years) good books about compilers or interpreters or assemblers or linkers?

Sorry. I don't read books about compilers a long time ago. I just remember some from Wirth, but nothing special. I read differents pages, documents, articles, and papers from the Web.
Lazarus 1.6 - FPC 3.0.0 - x86_64-win64 on  Windows 7

440bx

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In your opinion:
What are the best books about compilers or interpreters or assemblers or linkers?
Is there any new (last five or ten years) good books about compilers or interpreters or assemblers or linkers?
My favorite book about compilers is Per Brinch Hansen's "On pascal compilers".  IMO, it's probably the best book ever written on compilers.  It's the one book that truly aims to make the reader understand the techniques used to define and convert a language (usually high level) into a series of instructions.

There is little to nothing in it about assemblers and linkers but, if you want to truly understand how a language is defined (I should say, _one_ way of defining a language/grammar) and the foundation of going from grammar to low level instructions, I don't believe there is a better book.

Unfortunately, at least at this time, the prices people are asking for it are rather steep but, if sometime you can get it for a reasonable amount, I believe you'll be very pleased.

I should also note that it is an introductory text but it opens the door to easily _understand_ (instead of just learning) other techniques presented in more advanced books.

HTH.

using FPC v3.0.4 and Lazarus 1.8.2 on Windows 7 64bit.

Trenatos

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I've started playing with Plex/Pyacc again, I'll start adding pages as I go.

JdeHaan

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For those interested, I published my hobby interpreter project on GitHub:

https://github.com/jdehaan2014/GearLanguage

It is a procedural object-oriented functional language, supporting anonymous functions. I wrote everything I coded from start to finish with explanations and sample Gear code in the accompanying document (pdf).

All comments are welcome.
Cheers!

MarkMLl

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I've just tacked some stuff onto the end which includes a couple of useful links on the history of recursive descent etc. which I hope somebody finds interesting.

I admit that I take some of this rather personally, since at about the same time as I joined Burroughs a document appeared where the author (Richard Waychoff) claimed that he had invented recursive descent and virtual memory. I was very dismissive of this, feeling that it was a company man writing for company men, but 40 years on and with the benefit of various oral histories etc. I think he has a very good claim to precedence on both fronts.

MarkMLl