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Author Topic: WARNING: fpcupdeluxe will rm -rf your home directory (or whichever is your CWD)  (Read 876 times)

hunghung

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But anyway, thank you. Because of your non-standard way of using it, we know Fpcupdeluxe has such a bug. People use it the proper way like me will never discover that bug  ;)

It seems you still did not understand what happened: It deleted the current working directory. In my case it deleted itself, all its ini files and all other files and folders next to it. It had nothing to do with the way I used it.

Have you seen the screencast I linked above? I put it in its own folder and started it, just like you suggested. The outcome was it deleted itself and all of its ini files! Deleting CWD is the most severe bug you can ever imagine, it has absolutely nothing to do with the way one uses it.

Making a desktop shortcut and clicking on it would have deleted the entire home directory on XFCE and possibly others because the CWD is not set in these desktop starters by default.

What is your definition of CWD?

I imagined you put it to PATH, then on another directory where it isn't placed you open a terminal window and issue ./ to execute it. I think this dir, which is returned by pwd, is the CWD.

Your CWD instead seemed to be the directory where it is placed.

If your CWD is the same as me, there is nothing wrong. I can never be hurt by this bug at all, because I will never put it to PATH and execute it elsewhere, nor I will put it on my ~ as I am too lazy so I just left it at ~/Downloads. It could wiped my Downloads dir, which I prefer to be empty after all.

I can't view your screencast. On OpenIndiana, there is no way to play video or even audio file. VLC exists on the pkg repo, but will not work. The only way I could watch video is on youtube using Firefox web browser. OK, I almost forgot. Firefox could open the .mp4 as well. This is my mistake.

I said about GUI applications in general, it's my way of manage them. I'm too lucky, thank you very much for informed that this app has that serious bug, I not yet make a .desktop file for it. Anyway, you could open the .desktop file by your favorite text editor and add the CWD yourself.

I think we should end our discussion here. I admit I'm wrong and this bug is very serious. Thank you for informed us  :)

hunghung

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Remember, you only put applications into ~/bin or ~/.local/bin if they are command line applications. Fpcupdeluxe is a graphical application. Do you expect to run a GUI application from the terminal? I will not. At least I will create a .desktop file for it and start it through that .desktop file.

If that is the case, why do programmers including the authors of the Lazarus IDE output console messages? And why is it desirable- in fact well nigh essential- to look for console output messages when finding out why a GUI-oriented program vanishes without trace? And why do the majority of such programs come without an installation script, and an adjacent icon for the menu system?

MarkMLl

This is for debug purpose only. If you started firefox on the terminal, you will see a bunch of error messages. This is not what normal user would want to see. I'm said as a normal user. So I tried to mute these error messages by starting them directly by click/double click on them or via .desktop file, where I think the stderr to be null, or with some programs you could also find the error messages on dmesg.

MarkMLl

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This is for debug purpose only. If you started firefox on the terminal, you will see a bunch of error messages. This is not what normal user would want to see. I'm said as a normal user. So I tried to mute these error messages by starting them directly by click/double click on them or via .desktop file, where I think the stderr to be null, or with some programs you could also find the error messages on dmesg.

As a normal user that is entirely reasonable. But in that case I suggest not trying to dictate hard-and-fast rules like "X11 programs do not go in /bin" and so on.

In actual fact- and softening my earlier position a bit- for a long time the programs in /bin were the ones which were needed to get the system from its initial single-user initialised state to being able to mount the /usr and /home trees- which might be presented by a remote server over NFS. Hence it would be entirely reasonable to say "no graphical programs in there"... which is not a rule that Debian (as one particular example) obeys any more. Also I think that there are general moves afoot to merge /usr/bin back into /bin, so again the distinction is getting blurred.

MarkMLl
Turbo Pascal v1 on CCP/M-86, multitasking with LAN and graphics in 128Kb.
Pet hate: people who boast about the size and sophistication of their computer.