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Author Topic: The future of Free Pascal  (Read 86563 times)

Graeme

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Re: The future of Free Pascal
« Reply #300 on: March 23, 2017, 01:19:40 pm »
If my constraints are 16/32 GB to write and ship this software, well I might as well close shop.
As a CTO you seem to have a major lack of understanding when it comes to software development. A development machine does NOT equate to a end-user system. Developers don't have a normal workflow that end-users have. Developing with a high resource system doesn't mean your application requires those high resources too.

Quote
I personally have never seen a company have a group of developers all using multiple VMs.
Clearly you have been out of the programming scene for some time. VM's are quite common place now in development environments and in QA testing.
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marcov

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Re: The future of Free Pascal
« Reply #301 on: March 23, 2017, 01:36:54 pm »
To put this in context, my personal laptop back in 2007 was a 15.6" DELL Inspiron (weighs a ton) with a screen resolution of 1920x1200 and 4GB RAM and some 3Ghz CPU and a 128MB Radeon video card. I still have that laptop today (fully working, but not used any more). Pity laptop designs went backwards since then, now sporting shitty 1366x768 resolutions as common place. WTF! And the consumer seems happy with that?? WTFx2!

Weird. I got an inspiron from a more expensive series (the Inspirons already upgraded to Core 2) at roughly the same time, and that was not even an option. It was the first time I didn't get a Latitude, so I maxed out the inspiron 6400 a bit. But that was still conroe processors (so 2.2GHz was a lot), 2GB Ram, 1280x1024 and a 128MB GF7300.  The laptop chipset could not do more than 4GB, and Dell didn't even support that configuration. (rightly so even, since when I later upgraded it anyway, instability started)

Later 2007 might have given you a 2nd generation core2 (kentsfield), but afaik the laptop processors there never reached 3.0 GHz. I think 2.66 was about tops.

So either you have something really weird and exotic, or you got your dates wrong.

BeniBela

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Re: The future of Free Pascal
« Reply #302 on: March 23, 2017, 01:43:53 pm »
Weird. I got an inspiron from a more expensive series (the Inspirons already upgraded to Core 2) at roughly the same time, and that was not even an option. It was the first time I didn't get a Latitude, so I maxed out the inspiron 6400 a bit. But that was still conroe processors (so 2.2GHz was a lot), 2GB Ram, 1280x1024 and a 128MB GF7300.  The laptop chipset could not do more than 4GB, and Dell didn't even support that configuration. (rightly so even, since when I later upgraded it anyway, instability started)

I for one got a Latitude in 2011.   2.4  GHz, 4 GB RAM,  1440x900 and afair that model was all maxed

Graeme

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Re: The future of Free Pascal
« Reply #303 on: March 24, 2017, 04:20:52 pm »
Later 2007 might have given you a 2nd generation core2 (kentsfield), but afaik the laptop processors there never reached 3.0 GHz.
So either you have something really weird and exotic, or you got your dates wrong.
It was a DELL Inspiron 9100. This link shows the specs... 3.2Ghz.
   http://uk.pcmag.com/dell-inspiron-9100/28273/review/dell-inspiron-9100

and here it shows that there was even a 3.4Ghz option.
  http://www.notebookreview.com/news/dell-releases-new-inspiron-9100-pics/

I ordered it with 2GB RAM, then later upgraded it myself to 4GB - supported or not the RAM upgrade worked. I spoke to my wife, and she believes I bought it somewhere around 2003/2004.

Either way, it was the best laptop I have ever owned!

On a side note:
  I was brilliantly designed too. At the time I did contracting work and commuted on my motorcycle. Every
  two weeks or so the graphics would go buggy. I eventually figure out that it was the graphics module that
  shook loose because of the bumpy motorcycle trips. I then travelled with a single screwdriver to strip, reseat
  and put back together for the next two weeks. Yup, you only needed a single screwdriver to remove every
   single component from that laptop. Brilliant design! Compare that to days shit Apple Macbook Pro's that
   can't even be opened or serviced with normal tools, and they don't even have a Kensington lock!! So how
   are you supposed to secure your laptop at your work place, coffee shop, library etc.

« Last Edit: March 24, 2017, 04:32:13 pm by Graeme »
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john horst

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Re: The future of Free Pascal
« Reply #304 on: March 24, 2017, 04:54:50 pm »
If my constraints are 16/32 GB to write and ship this software, well I might as well close shop.
As a CTO you seem to have a major lack of understanding when it comes to software development. A development machine does NOT equate to a end-user system. Developers don't have a normal workflow that end-users have. Developing with a high resource system doesn't mean your application requires those high resources too.

Quote
I personally have never seen a company have a group of developers all using multiple VMs.
Clearly you have been out of the programming scene for some time. VM's are quite common place now in development environments and in QA testing.

I understand perfectly well that the end-user does not need that much ram, nor did I state that. If my developers need 32gb to write and ship software im done.

I don't do "scenes". I do real life, get shit done kind of work. Iv'e written at least half a million lines of Go in the last year and still do my JOB. Nice try though.

john horst

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Re: The future of Free Pascal
« Reply #305 on: March 24, 2017, 06:14:07 pm »
To put this in context, my personal laptop back in 2007 was a 15.6" DELL Inspiron (weighs a ton) with a screen resolution of 1920x1200 and 4GB RAM and some 3Ghz CPU and a 128MB Radeon video card. I still have that laptop today (fully working, but not used any more). Pity laptop designs went backwards since then, now sporting shitty 1366x768 resolutions as common place. WTF! And the consumer seems happy with that?? WTFx2!

Weird. I got an inspiron from a more expensive series (the Inspirons already upgraded to Core 2) at roughly the same time, and that was not even an option. It was the first time I didn't get a Latitude, so I maxed out the inspiron 6400 a bit. But that was still conroe processors (so 2.2GHz was a lot), 2GB Ram, 1280x1024 and a 128MB GF7300.  The laptop chipset could not do more than 4GB, and Dell didn't even support that configuration. (rightly so even, since when I later upgraded it anyway, instability started)

Later 2007 might have given you a 2nd generation core2 (kentsfield), but afaik the laptop processors there never reached 3.0 GHz. I think 2.66 was about tops.

So either you have something really weird and exotic, or you got your dates wrong.

He does not want to admit exotic for the era. In 2004 I had a 3GHZ/ HT Laptop. It was exotic for the era, as the commenter thought that rez was high at the time. http://sfuse.deviantart.com/art/blender-2-34-10575567

It was not common hardware, but possible.

marcov

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Re: The future of Free Pascal
« Reply #306 on: March 24, 2017, 06:28:42 pm »
It was a DELL Inspiron 9100. This link shows the specs... 3.2Ghz.
   http://uk.pcmag.com/dell-inspiron-9100/28273/review/dell-inspiron-9100

Oh dear. P4. Most people rather forget that period :-)

Kays

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Re: The future of Free Pascal
« Reply #307 on: March 25, 2017, 07:40:28 pm »
[…]VM's are quite common place now in development environments […]
Containers. Containers are cool now.  ;)

It was exotic for the era, as the commenter thought that rez was high at the time. [… deviantart link …]
Yeah, it still is. I like my laptops small and mobile.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2017, 07:45:37 pm by Kays »
Yours Sincerely
Kai Burghardt

Akira1364

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Re: The future of Free Pascal
« Reply #308 on: March 26, 2017, 01:30:03 am »
It was a DELL Inspiron 9100. This link shows the specs... 3.2Ghz.
   http://uk.pcmag.com/dell-inspiron-9100/28273/review/dell-inspiron-9100

Oh dear. P4. Most people rather forget that period :-)

Yeah... "3.2 ghz". Extra emphasis on the quotation marks!  ;)

I can't imagine how hot that thing must have gotten after running for a few hours. Also, why would you even bother upgrading the RAM on a machine that still has a terrible, terrible GPU like a Mobile Radeon 9700 (with a whopping 128 MB of VRAM!)
« Last Edit: March 26, 2017, 03:29:48 am by Akira1364 »

Graeme

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Re: The future of Free Pascal
« Reply #309 on: March 27, 2017, 05:50:10 pm »
It was exotic for the era, as the commenter thought that rez was high at the time. [… deviantart link …]
Yeah, it still is. I like my laptops small and mobile.
Maybe now it is considered "exotic", simply because all laptop manufacturers started producing shit laptops after 2004. Things are supposed to improve, not take a hell of a step backwards!

At the time I definitely didn't consider that laptop exotic. It was simply a choice on DELL's website (like many others), and knowing full well that laptops are always overpriced and has very limited upgradability, I order the best I could for the money I had (it was going to replace an ageing desktop PC). I did this so it could last as long as it could. I used that laptop for 8 years, so I think it did pretty darn well.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2017, 06:10:35 pm by Graeme »
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Graeme

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Re: The future of Free Pascal
« Reply #310 on: March 27, 2017, 06:06:40 pm »
I can't imagine how hot that thing must have gotten after running for a few hours.
Running hot was never a problem. If I remember correct, it had something like 4 fans and a massive heat sink. What was an issue was the weight and battery live - 2 hours 30 minutes max on a fully charged battery. Luckily I always worked at a desk with a power point. Also, you could never work on the laptop on your lap - your legs would go numb in a few minutes from the weight. :)

Quote
Also, why would you even bother upgrading the RAM on a machine that still has a terrible, terrible GPU like a Mobile Radeon 9700 (with a whopping 128 MB of VRAM!)
I don't fully understand. I played loads of times at game LAN parties (Counter Strike, Half-Life, Quake etc). It was awesome. Everybody lugging around pimped out desktop PCs and massive 17 or 19 inch CRT monitors that took 30+ minutes to set up. And here I come with my awesome laptop in a single backpack. It turned lots of heads at the time. Oh, and the sound was fantastic too - even included a sub woofer built into the battery housing.

It also came standard with Windows XP. I downgraded it to Windows 2000 and ran modified desktop radeon 9700 drivers. The speed tests I did at the time outperformed ALL other DELL Inspiron 9100 ratings I could find.
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Graeme

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Re: The future of Free Pascal
« Reply #311 on: March 27, 2017, 06:13:10 pm »
Oh dear. P4. Most people rather forget that period :-)
:)  At least I didn't get the Ghz rating or screen resolution wrong.  DELL also marketed in as a "desktop replacement laptop" - so its weight and short battery life was not too surprising.
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Artlav

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Re: The future of Free Pascal
« Reply #312 on: March 31, 2017, 09:42:17 pm »
For example the Lazarus project itself has rather many source files but I can work with them smoothly using the IDE.
Sorry for the off-topic, but i ended up doing just that, and am curious what your workflow looks like?
Specifically, how do you quickly get to/switch to a particular arbitrary file in a project?

Ondrej Pokorny

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Re: The future of Free Pascal
« Reply #313 on: April 07, 2017, 04:23:49 pm »
For example the Lazarus project itself has rather many source files but I can work with them smoothly using the IDE.
Sorry for the off-topic, but i ended up doing just that, and am curious what your workflow looks like?
Specifically, how do you quickly get to/switch to a particular arbitrary file in a project?

I created the "Open Unit" command in Lazarus 1.7. If you execute it (e.g. with a key shortcut), you get a list of all available units. Then you type a few characters and you open the file you want.

JuhaManninen

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Re: The future of Free Pascal
« Reply #314 on: April 07, 2017, 05:45:45 pm »
Specifically, how do you quickly get to/switch to a particular arbitrary file in a project?
Sorry didn't notice this earlier.
See also my reply here about bookmarks etc.
 http://forum.lazarus-ide.org/index.php/topic,31971.msg241405.html#msg241405
Arbitrary file in project which is not open yet?
There is the Project Inspector and Project -> Units list. In big Lazarus project all files are not included in project explicitly. Sometimes I use the Open File button if I know the name of a file.
Most often however I use the Find in Files dialog. I am interested in some text inside a file. Usually I don't care about the file's name. When I find what I wanted, I put a bookmark there. Then I jump with Ctrl-Click and maybe put more bookmarks. I may move the interesting editor files next to each other. All together there can be like 50 or 100 files open in editor after searching and jumping but their names and locations are often not the main interest.

For example I recently did a big refactoring for AVLTree and related containers. I opened all those files for editing from Find in Files results window, except one file from FPC trunk sources using Open File button.

Also when haunting a certain bug, the biggest challenge is to find the right place. I often search for GUI strings or other keywords to get close to it.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2017, 05:48:39 pm by JuhaManninen »

 

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